Population

 

Worldwide

  • World population grew to 7.06 billion in mid-2012.
  • Developing countries accounted for 97 percent of this growth due to high birth rates and young populations.
  • Conversely, in the developed countries the annual number of births barely exceeds deaths because of low birth rates and much older populations.
  • By 2025, it is likely that deaths will exceed births in the developed countries, the first time this will have happened in history.
  • Nearly all future population growth will be in the world's less developed countries, and the poorest of these countries will see the greatest percentage increase. Of these countries, 33 are in sub-Saharan Africa, 14 in Asia, and one in the Caribbean. They are growing at 2.4 percent per year and are projected to reach at least 2 billion by 2050.
  • Europe is likely to be the first region in history to see long-term population decline, largely as a result of low fertility in Eastern Europe and Russia. Europe's population is projected to decrease from 740 million today to 732 million by 2050.
  • Nearly half the world's population—some 3 billion people—is under the age of 25 and entering their childbearing years. The majority of these youth live in developing countries with limited access to family planning and reproductive health services.
  • More than 14 million girls ages 15-19 give birth each year, and they are twice as likely as women 20-34 to die from pregnancy-related causes.
  • While the rate of population growth has slowed in most parts of the world, we still increase by nearly 80 million people every year—the equivalent of adding another U.S. to the world every four years.
  • The number of people on the planet has doubled since 1960, and if current growth rates continue, the world’s population would hit 11 billion by 2050.
  • Approximately half the world’s population now lives in cities and towns.
  • 2.6 billion people or 39 percent of the world’s population live without access to improved sanitation. The vast majority live in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.
  • 751 million people share their sanitation facilities with other households or only use public facilities.
  • Maternal mortality is higher in women living in rural areas and among poorer communities.
  • The majority of the world’s poor are women.
  • On average, women live six to eight years longer than men globally.
  • Women’s life expectancy at birth is more than 80 years in 35 countries, but only 54 years in the WHO African Region.
  • Girls are far more likely than boys to suffer sexual abuse.
  • At least one out of every three women in the world has been raped, beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise violently abused in her lifetime.
  • An estimated one in five women will be a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.
  • Around the world, 215 million women want to prevent pregnancy but are not using any method of contraception.
  • The average income of the richest 10 percent of the population is about nine times that of the poorest 10 percent, up from seven times 25 years ago.
  • Women occupy only 18 percent of parliamentary seats around the world.
  • 2 million children died as a result of armed conflict during the past decade and another six million were injured or disabled, according to UNICEF estimates.
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The United States

  • In 2012, 26.5 million (14 percent) of people ages 18-64 were in poverty.
  • In 2012, 16.1 million (22 percent) children under the age of 18 were in poverty.
  • In 2012, 49.0 million Americans lived in food insecure households, 33.1 million adults and 15.9 million children.
  • The number of people living in poverty in 2012 (46.5 million) is the largest number seen in the 54 years for which poverty estimates have been published.
  • In 2012, the poverty rate for people living with a disability was 28.4%. That’s 4.3 million people living with a disability in poverty.
  • In 2012, the National Center on Family Homelessness analyzed state-level data and found that nationwide, 1.6 million children experience homelessness in a year.
  • 34.2% of the population—or 106.4 million—live close to poverty, with incomes less than two times that of their poverty thresholds.
  • More than one quater of americans now live in poverty.
  • Families comprise nearly 40% of all who are homeless.
  • 68% of the cities reporting in the 2010 Mayor's Report, had to turn away homeless families with children because of a lack of available shelter beds.
  • According to the 2010 US Conference of Mayors report, Family homelessness increased by 9%.
  • Among families who are homeless with children, the majority cited loss of a job as the cause, followed by the lack of affordable housing, poverty, low-paying jobs and domestic violence.
  • 42% of homeless children are under the age of 6.
  • A child is born into poverty every 33 seconds.
  • Families with children comprise one of the fastest-growing segments of the homeless population today.
  • More than 15% of Americans live in poverty, including one in five children (22%), the highest rate in the industrialized world.
  • Almost 60% of Americans will spend at least one year below the poverty line at some point between ages 25 and 75.
  • There is no city or county anywhere in the United States where a worker making the minimum wage can afford a fair market rate one-bedroom apartment.
  • The cost of rent and utilities for a typical two-bedroom apartment increased 41% from 2000 to 2009.
  • 2 million additional American children will fall victim to the foreclosure crisis over the next two years.

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